What’s next for the Supreme Court?

The last Supreme Court term ended in June with two huge victories for free speech. The next term might bring more of the same.

This fall, the justices will decide whether to hear a free speech case that could have major ramifications for voters across the country. In Minnesota Voters Alliance v. Mansky, I represent Minnesota voters in their First Amendment challenge to a government-imposed dress code at polling places in the North Star State.

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Forcing people to fill the war chests of political opponents in the name of “democracy”

Guest post by Ethan Blevins. Ethan graduated with a BA in political science from BYU-Idaho and a JD and LLM from Duke School of Law. He was a judicial clerk for Justice Don Willett of the Texas Supreme Court and is currently an attorney with the Pacific Legal Foundation. The views expressed in this post are his own.

Few subjects incite ire like campaign finance and the First Amendment. At a Trader Joe’s in Seattle not long ago, I was accosted by an activist seeking signatures for a petition to overturn Citizens United—perhaps the most notorious and misunderstood campaign-finance case of all time. Shoppers gladly signed his petition until he reached me.

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What does the March for Science say about GMOs?

The March for Science bills itself as a celebration of science. It warns of “an alarming trend toward discrediting scientific consensus.” “Policies that ignore scientific evidence,” the group says, “endanger both human life and the future of our world.”

The same can be said of the federal government’s plans to mandate GMO labeling.

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Assorted First Amendment links

A federal appeals court based in Philadelphia held that citizens have a First Amendment to record on-duty police officers. Eugene Volokh recites key portions of the case, Fields v. City of Philadelphia, in the Washington Post’s Volokh Conspiracy blog. The Atlantic applauds the decision as a “significant milestone” in First Amendment law. Meanwhile, the Electronic Frontier Foundation pointed out that the court’s decision may be limited in three ways. Slate summarizes the real-world impact of the decision: “Bystander videos may not eliminate police misconduct. But they play a vital role in our national debate about the lawfulness of law enforcement.”

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Free speech, menu labeling, and the $100 cup of coffee

How much would you pay for a cup of coffee? Two dollars? Twenty dollars? How about a hundred?

You’re less likely to buy a cup of coffee if the price jumps from two dollars to twenty. Your chances of purchasing the beverage are even lower if the price skyrockets to a hundred dollars. This is basic economics: as the price rises, demand drops.

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